FDA Panel Chairman On BPA Secretly Received $5 Million Payment.

June 8, 2009

UM…wow. If this is true, I don’t even know what to say – but I wanted to share this article with you guys this morning. Take a look and let me know what you think. Oh, and if you don’t know what it is, here is a good explanation of what BPA is and why it is so bad.

As an FDA panel prepares to issue a ruling on whether the controversial chemical bisphenol A (BPA) should be considered safe, press reports have revealed that the research center headed by the panel’s chair recently received a massive donation from a vocal BPA supporter and former medical device manufacturer.

In July, the University of Michigan’s Risk Science Center, headed by FDA panel chair Martin Philbert, received a $5 million donation from anti-regulation activist Charles Gelman. This donation amounted to almost 50 times the center’s annual budget, but was never reported to the FDA.

Gelman vocally supports organizations that are critical of research into the risks of chemicals, global warming and other environmental hazards. He also has a long history of opposing government regulation of pollutants.

That is pretty disturbing in and of itself, a donation coming into an FDA Science Center from an anti-regulatory guy. But it gets better…or worse, depending on which side you are on…

Gelman told reporters that he considers BPA to be perfectly safe, and that he made his perspective clear to Philbert on multiple occasions.

“He knows where I stand,” he said.

The FDA’s associate commissioner for science, Norris Alderson, responded to the revelation by saying that since Gelman’s salary was not paid from Gelman’s donation, the agency does not regard it as a conflict of interest.

BPA is a widely used industrial chemical that helps make plastics hard and translucent. It has found uses in polycarbonate plastic water and baby bottles, as part of the resins that line cans of food, and in non-food products such as compact discs.

Laboratory studies have implicated the chemical as a hormone mimic and endocrine disruptor, however, with the potential to cause reproductive, developmental and neurological problems, particularly in infants and children. Concerns over the chemical have been heightened by findings that it can leach from plastics and resins into food and beverages, especially when heated. Scientists have found traces of the chemical in the bodies of 90 percent of people over the age of six.

From Natural News. Disclaimer – I don’t know where this guy got his info, as it’s not sourced on his own site, so take this with a grain of salt. But if it is true, then, well – wow. I am going to do some homework on this now.

So, what do you think?

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About the Author:

After a varied past of being a test driver for automotive television programs, a Hollywood studio lackey, and an online media sales director, David is now the publisher and editor of The Good Human. In his spare time he rides motorcycles, drinks good beer, and builds stuff in the garage. You can follow him on Twitter at @thegoodhuman or G+ at Google
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Comments (3)

  1. karissa says:

    day-yum. all I have to say is I wonder how bad it REALLY is. I have to share this with my readers. scary stuff, thanks for sharing D!

  2. This is such a sore subject for me. It concerns me so much since I have little ones. I sure hope it isn’t true. That would be a new low.

  3. waste_diverter says:

    It is true (http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/10/fda-chair-takes-money-bpa-supporter.php) and if no one speaks out, it seems corporations will rule the day, and our health, as usual: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/05/30/AR2009053002121.html

    And yes, while Natural News sometimes reports on stuff that is already known (in this case from last Fall, and so is not necessarily untrue) they are famous for capitalizing on fear-mongering.