The Top 100 Corporate Polluters In The United States.

June 16, 2009

Here is a list that you don’t want to read…but you have to. The Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) at UMass has updated their list of the Top 100 corporate polluters in the U.S. for 2009, which “identifies the top U.S. air polluters among the world’s largest corporations. The index relies on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Risk Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) project. The starting point for the RSEI is the EPA’s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), which reports on releases of toxic chemicals at facilities across the United States.”

Here are the top 10 worst polluters, along with their Toxic score (pounds released x toxicity x population exposure):

  • E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co. – 285,661
  • Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) – 213,159
  • Dow Chemical – 189,673
  • Bayer Group – 172,773
  • Eastman Kodak – 162,430
  • General Electric – 149,061
  • Arcelor Mittal – 134,573
  • U.S. Steel – 129,123
  • ExxonMobil – 128,758
  • AK Steel Holding – 101,428

The Top 100 list also has plant and pollution locations, so you can see how close you live to any of these worst offenders. Some scary stuff on here, even from companies who try to greenwash their way onto sustainable environmental sites!

Filed in: Pollution • Tags: , ,

About the Author:

After a varied past of being a test driver for automotive television programs, a Hollywood studio lackey, and an online media sales director, David is now the publisher and editor of The Good Human. In his spare time he rides motorcycles, drinks good beer, and builds stuff in the garage. You can follow him on Twitter at @thegoodhuman or G+ at Google
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Comments (3)

  1. Amanda Crater says:

    Interesting who is on this list considering that ExxonMobil was Forbes’ Green Company of the Year and GE has been recognized for its sustainability efforts through its Ecoimagination program.

  2. Jenny Lynes says:

    I have a question about the ecoimagination type initiatives. That program has done really wonderful things (i.e. installing clean water systems in Africa, etc.)
    So, if you work for GE/whoever because you value those types of benevolent projects, are you still a part of the problem? Are those efforts honorable, or not really when compared to the harm they cause.
    Thoughts?