BPA Levels Increase Tenfold After One Serving Of Canned Food

November 29, 2011

A new study has shown that eating just one serving of canned food over a five day period elevates ones level of bisphenol-A, or BPA, in the bloodstream by over 10x the normal level. Published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, the study highlights the potential danger of the usage of BPA in canned food linings. BPA mimics the sex hormone estradiol, and some studies on mice and rats have shown structural damage to the brain, abnormal sexual behavior, early puberty and disrupted reproductive cycles, while human studies have it linked to higher risk of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

For several years now we have known that BPA can play a disruptive role in our neurological and reproductive systems, so seeing that just one helping of a canned food can increase levels tenfold is tough to swallow. A recent study found that 96 percent of pregnant women in the U.S. have at least trace amounts of BPA in their systems already, so I am guessing that most of us have elevated levels of the stuff too — especially after the holidays. This study confirms just how quickly BPA levels increase, and serves as a good reminder as to why we should limit our intake of canned foods when possible.

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About the Author:

After a varied past of being a test driver for automotive television programs, a Hollywood studio lackey, and an online media sales director, David is now the publisher and editor of The Good Human. In his spare time he rides motorcycles, drinks good beer, and builds stuff in the garage. You can follow him on Twitter at @thegoodhuman or G+ at Google
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Comments (5)

  1. Christine Borsuk says:

    The Eden Organics brand claims to use a BPA-free can lining; how do they get around this problem? Also, I’ve heard that in Canada BPA use has been made illegal–is this true? What about those cans of Campbell soup on the shelves?

    • david says:

      Yes, they do, and I heard Muir Glen does too. They use a food-based lining, I believe. Not sure if Canada has banned it yet, but they (and some European countries) have declared it toxic and are implementing bans.

  2. Brenna @ Almost All The Truth says:

    Isn’t that incredible? I didn’t look at the study, but did they specify any foods in particular. I know tomatoes are particularly bad and some don’t leach the BPA as much. I just hope they continue to find and use safe alternatives for all canned foods and everything else containing BPA.

  3. Joe says:

    people ya gotta realize..

    bpa isn’t the only estrogenic plastic
    and may not be the most estrogenic

    u just can’t do plastic

    which is better for our planet!!!

    wake up!