Gas Is A Steal In The U.S. Compared To Europe.

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So maybe we should stop complaining?

Honked off by American pump prices? Cheer up. You could be commuting in Oslo, Norway, where gasoline costs $9.85 a gallon and filling up a Mini Cooper would set you back $130. That’s the priciest petrol on a list of world gas prices released Wednesday by Associates for International Research Inc., a Massachusetts-based relocation consulting firm that tracks the cost of living in dozens of countries. In fact, at just more than four bucks a gallon on average, U.S. gas is still cheap compared with much of the world.

$9.85 a gallon. Imagine that. Now, doesn’t $4.50 a gallon sound like a deal? It’s half off! Really, I don’t mind gas prices going up, as I think it will force people to rethink their transportation needs and wants, as well as create a greater interest in alternative fuels and smaller or electric cars. I look forward to the day when I can drive my electric car that was charged up by my own solar panels!

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Comments

  1. I think the biggest issue is the huge impact that the price increase is having for people. If the price had creeped up over the years people wouldn’t be nearly as shocked. I don’t mind the price of gas going up its just how it goes up that bothers me. It goes up 5% per barrel and it goes up 20% at the pump. The increases just don’t correlate to the price of crude. Also the hidden taxes that are part of the gas price also bug me since I don’t see nearly enough infrastructure work to alleviate the problems (such as transit or alternate energy sources).

  2. I agree Matt, they don’t do enough with the taxes they collect. But I do think higher gas prices are good for America, as it will encourage people to push their representatives for alternatives (hopefully not ethanol, one of the worst decisions ever) and it will encourage them to buy smaller cars, thus conserving what oil we do have left.

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