Simple Greywater Recycling For Flushing Your Toilet.

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Don’t know what greywater is? Imagine the water going down the drain in your bathroom – but finding one more use before heading out to the sewer. That, my friends, is greywater. It’s not clean but yet it’s not really dirty like toilet water, so why not recycle it again before it really goes down the drain! Although I live in an apartment and my landlord would never allow me to install something like this, the idea behind it is quite fantastic and if the future home I buy doesn’t already have something like this installed (earthship, anyone?) I would definitely consider installing one. AQUS is one of the systems I was able to find online, and they supposedly make units that can be used with your existing toilet. Score!

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Water, more than 4.8 billion gallons of water is flushed down U.S. toilets each day. The American Water Works Association estimates that if water-saving features were installed in every U.S. household, water use would decrease by 30 percent. That would reduce daily water used by about 5.4 billion gallons, resulting in $113 million dollar-volume savings a day. AQUS can reduce metered water usage in a two-person household by about 10-20 gallons a day – or approximately 5,000 gallons a year.

5,000 gallons a year…now imagine every home with some sort of system in place like this…the savings would be amazing. It does not look like it is too difficult to install if you know a little bit about plumbing – does anyone have any experience with these type of things? Looks like it just redirects the water from the sink drain into a tank that is used to flush the toilet. It really does not make much sense that we use sink water only once to brush our teeth or wash our hands and send it on to the sewer or septic tank. Wouldn’t it make more sense to use that water again to flush with? It could certainly relieve problems with town sewers being overloaded and with your septic tank being pumped too often (costing a lot)…never mind how much water we could save. Water seems to be in high demand this past year so it would make sense for cities and towns to have these type of systems installed.

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Comments

  1. Earthships treat all sewage on site, sustainably and is healthy for the environment.

    We must become more aware of where our sewage goes.

    Sewage: Earthships contain use and reuse all household sewage in indoor and outdoor treatment cells resulting in food production and landscaping with no pollution of aquifers. Toilets flush with greywater that does not smell.

    http://www.earthship.net

  2. In addition to saving water, this will also save the ENERGY required to pump water to your house. I’ve heard estimates of 30% of energy use is devoted to moving water around.

  3. thats right… when using greywater to flush you toilet you save an average of %40 of daily water use and a lot of energy, not sure about 30% of the energy just for flushing the toilet. But moving water is energy intensive. This is a big reason why we have designed things down to still offer the same ammenities and expectations.

    For example, our cisterns are raised to take advantage of the weight of the water to help pressurize the home, this makes the pumps work less AND last longer.

    http://www.earthship.net

  4. Are there any states in the US in which greywater reuse is specifically auhorized for toilet flushing? If so, which ones? I ask as I am working on legislation to make it legal in California and would like to point to other states (or even other countries) where it is legal and being done. Thanks.

    Don

  5. I am getting ready to build a house and I am interested in al common scense “green” solutions that have a 10 year payback or less and or are just not really expensive to do. I have heard that solar is expensive but has a reasonable payback. I am interest in greywater reuse for landscapes and toilets. Is this legal in California and if not why?

  6. I am getting ready to build a house and I am interested in al common scense “green” solutions that have a 10 year payback or less and or are just not really expensive to do. I have heard that solar is expensive but has a reasonable payback. I am interest in greywater reuse for landscapes and toilets. Is this legal in California and if not why?

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