Travel Advisory for Visitors to the U.S. – AfterDowningStreet.org

No Comments

 
----------- Sponsored Links -----------
----------- Sponsored Links -----------
 

These are some snippets from a posting at AfterDowningStreet.org, that is a translation of a letter sent to the Italian press regarding the signing into law of the Military Commissions Act of 2006. Be sure to go read the whole letter!

Stephanie Westbrook
U.S. Citizens for Peace & Justice – Rome


As U.S. citizens, October 17 will be remembered as a dark day in our nation’s history, the day George W. Bush signed the Military Commissions Act of 2006. The new law, authorized by Congress (on yet another dark day), gives the president unprecedented powers to imprison anyone he considers an “unlawful enemy combatant” and to try those so labeled via military commissions.

SNIP

The travel advisory should emphasize that non-U.S. citizens labeled as “unlawful enemy combatants” may be arrested and imprisoned indefinitely without charge. In fact, the new law eliminates the right of habeas corpus, the right of detainees to challenge their imprisonment in court.

SNIP

According to the terms of this law, if and when a prisoner is tried, it will be via a military commission convened by the Secretary of Defense or other military official and composed of a military judge, prosecutor and defense attorneys. The detainee will not benefit from legal protections considered essential by international standards.

SNIP

The approved “interrogation techniques” will be decided by the president and will not be made public. In addition, the right to appeal has been all but eliminated and any appeal based on the Geneva Conventions will be denied.

And finally, the advisory should remind travelers that in January of 2006, Kellogg, Brown & Root, a Halliburton subsidiary, won a $385 million contract to build detention centers in undisclosed locations within the United State to be used, as stated in a company press release, for the “rapid development of new programs.”

Stephanie Westbrook
U.S. Citizens for Peace & Justice – Rome

Read the whole letter at AfterDowningStreet.org

technorati tags:Bush Geneva Convention habeas corpus

----------- Sponsored Links -----------
----------- Sponsored Links -----------

Comments

  1. Hello and thanks for the opportunity to read and post on your blog.

    I”™ve just posted an article related to travel tips for seniors on my blog and I thought maybe you”™d be interested in reading it. Here is short preview of some of the areas I covered:

    – Prefer a backpack on wheels instead of a suitcase, you could pull it behind you when your back hurts or you are exhausted.
    – Consider checking your bag in with the airlines, because it would become an unnecessary burden to be dragged all over the airport or the city if you are going to have a short visit.
    – You could stay outside the city, in a hostel maybe, because it is cheaper, less crowded and the air is much fresher, but you have to walk or use the transport more, to get in the city or to the station.
    – Most museums, some concert halls, railways, airlines, bus lines, ferry and shipping lines have a discount policy for seniors.
    – Electronic devices are useful but sometimes they can give you a lot of headaches. You could help yourself with a micro-tape recorder to record your notes. It would be easier than to write and you would put them down on paper later, to share your notes with your family.
    – If you bring a camera with you to keep the beautiful images alive along the time then make sure you know how to handle it or you might fail to record them not only on that camera but also in your eyes.

    For more resources on travelling to Europe you are welcome to visit my blog, where you can also get acces to some excellent maps of Rome and maps of Berlin, together with information on hotels and restaurants.

    Best regards,

    Michael R.

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *